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BTS’s ARMY & Other K-Pop Fandoms Angered Over Hollywood Reporter’s Description Of K-Pop

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BTS’s ARMY & Other K-Pop Fandoms Angered Over Hollywood Reporter’s Description Of K-Pop

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Big Hit Entertainment

The perception of K-Pop is a tricky thing when you’re not too familiar with it.

If you asked someone what they thought of K-Pop and they answered saying something like:

“It’s an industry that is cutthroat because there are idols getting plastic surgery all the time while trying so hard to get their skin tone as white as possible.”

How does that make you feel?

Ok, so perhaps idols getting plastic surgery may have some truth to it, but the fact is that celebrities and idols from different cultures, not just K-Pop, often times get certain cosmetic procedures done. As K-Pop fans, we can’t deny that some times idols actually do get certain types of surgeries. Of course, this is also referring to K-Pop’s earliest days before the recent popularity of the scene.

As for whitening skin tone, it has been a standard of beauty in South Korea for quite a long time. But also at the same time, it’s not the only beauty standard that exists in K-Pop. There are many darker skin toned idols who have been admired by fans for their unique look.

Sounds fair enough right? No reason to be alarmed.

But what is problematic for K-Pop fans regarding this issue is how the tragic and unfortunate death of a loved K-Pop idol was brought up to describe K-Pop’s competitive nature, in addition to applying the stereotype and assumption that plastic surgery and trying to get the whitest skin when describing K-Pop.

So to the point, an article by ‘The Hollywood Reporter’ has left BTS’s fandom ARMY and other K-Pop fandoms in a state of rage.

 

Below is a description of K-Pop by the article.

“Thousands of wannabe K-pop stars compete at regular American Idol-style cattle calls. Those lucky enough to make it to the next level spend years learning their craft inside secretive K-pop training camps, where they’re sometimes subjected to dangerous diets, strict social rules (no dating), grueling rehearsal schedules and mandated plastic surgery and skin-whitening procedures.”

And it goes on.

“Only the best of the best wind up in an actual K-pop band — while some don’t survive at all. In 2017, the industry drew intense scrutiny after a member of SHINee, another popular K-pop band, took his own life, writing in his suicide note that he felt “broken on the inside.”

Fans haven’t been too happy about it as well.

 

But things don’t end just here. ARMY have been criticizing Big Hit Entertainment for allowing the article to portray RM as an arrogant person. ARMY believe that the article misquoted RM’s statement in the past.

“We have to consider ourselves not just better [than other K-pop acts], but the best,” says RM, BTS’ 25-year-old charismatic leader. “When we’re out there on that stage, we’re there to conquer. We think we’re the ones.”

 

What do you think about this situation?

 

Read More : Upcoming K-Pop Comeback & Debut Lineup In October 2019

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bts

Guest
Guest

I am mad that they keep putting Jonghyun when they said like there are strict rules and this and that and the kpop industry is horrible and I started crying when they brought him up and I cant deal with the articles anymore

Guest
Guest

I do not see what’s wrong with them telling the truth, that’s what a reporter is supposed to do…

Guest
Guest

A lot of it about the k-pop industry was factual and pointed towards people who know never or very little about it. I was a top to bottom description, but also what is plainly viewable and can be found with just a tiny bit of research. Other than seeming to mistranslate what RM/Namjoon said, I don’t see a problem with it. More so using the death of another k-pop star shouldn’t be used to describe the entire industry. There have been many suicides in Hollywood and the western music industry, as well, but they are not defined by it. I… Read more »

Ii
Ii

why did they do that?? its not witty or funny and its just plain inappropriate

Guest
Guest

It’s the ugly truth, their anger is misdirected

Guest
Guest

It’s a shame to bring up the very beloved Jonghyun in that rag mag article. One ought not report without knowledge of the subject matter they’re writing about. I am thrilled K-pop is breaking in here at the USA…everyone should stop being so critical, just chill and enjoy the music. I welcome BTS, SuperM, and all!

Guest
Guest

But example of what? Jonghyun suffered from depression. The Kpop industry didn’t kill him, his mental illness did. To say that he died because the industry was terrible is so unfair to him and to everyone who suffers from depression. Say “South Korea still stigmatizes mental illness” and I would accept that as true. Say “Jonghyun needed help that wasn’t available in his country.” Sure. But, to just say “Hey the industry is so harsh that it killed him.” No. There were others about whom that’s true, but that wasn’t the case with Jonghyun.

Guest
Guest

They used him as an example, maybe the ignorance will stop and more tragedies can be avoided